Vocational Instructor (Episode 68)

Vocational Instructor (Episode 68)


Education is an important part
in everyone’s life. And when you’re ready for further education, you’ll rely on the assistance of a good teacher. Let’s meet one:
the vocational instructor. Hi. Well, hi. Brian. I’m Jacquie. Hi. We’ve been expecting you. My name is Jaccquie Scobie and I’m a faculty member
of the practical nursing program in the College of New Caledonia in Prince George. So, a vocational instructor
is a college-level educator preparing students for a particular career choice. Vocational instructors are needed in the fields of skilled professionals
to work in various fields in oil, in various natural resources, in the hands-on
labourers of carpentry, electricians. I’m a vocational instructor, as a registered nurse teaching students who want to be licensed practical nurses. So, a typical day would include, um, lesson planning, organizing papers and handouts,
getting PowerPoints prepared, doing any kind of lab setup—if we’re in the lab, doing any classroom setup
when we’re in the classroom, sometimes marking papers,
doing assignments, preparing exams. So, what would be a typical work week for you? Typically, we’re in the classroom
anywhere from 16 to 20 hours a week, but that would mean, for me, probably 40 to 60 hours
of additional time in preparation, would extend over a previous week or two ahead
of that to make sure I’m ready for today. Wow. And you would have to be
a real people person. I mean, you’re dealing with people in the classroom—all day—with their chosen career. We have to interact and be a part of their world, so in order to be effective, we need to be social. I was a bedside nurse for about 16 years
and then I got into management. And I started just as a registered nurse. That was my intended goal. And then I got into management, which kind of piqued another
interest in me. And from there I was allowed, and actually encouraged, to take my master’s degree. So, in considering a streamlined approach
to becoming a vocational instructor, would suggest that that person 18 or 19,
who chooses to do that, would probably get into university
transfer courses in the field of education, so that they would either
get a diploma or a degree in education and then pursue a master’s. If you are teaching in a college setting, a degree in education would probably suffice to get into some vocational instruction. If you want to be a professor at a university level,
you’ll need to get a master’s degree. How is a university professor or a
lecturer different from a vocational instructor? Vocational instruction allows the students
to be actively engaged in their learning. So, such as what we’ve got
the students doing behind us, right now, is working with the instrumentation,
doing assessments, being engaged in what they’re doing, as opposed to me just standing up
and showing them what to do. They’re actually doing what they’re learning. Communication, both verbal and written skills,
are very necessary. We need to be able to verbalize
the knowledge and the theory, but we also need to be able to put it in writing, so that they can actually take away some
information with them. The profession of instruction is lifelong learning. You’re always looking for what is best practice, what is working well,
what isn’t working well. We have to be juggling, even from minute to minute. If this line of questioning
or if this line of direction doesn’t work, if we’re not getting the participation we want… What do I need to change? How do I need to change
what I’m going to get from them? This position that I currently hold
opens up the doors. I could, uh, we have an
Associate Dean of Health Sciences, so there’s administrative functions that you can, that you can work yourself into,
if you wish to choose that. There’s dean, um, positions that are available, as well. I think I would suggest to first look
at what it is they want to do as a career and make a choice about what job
they would like to perform first. And then they could make a choice
about whether or not education or being an educator
or an instructor is part of that choice. Well, Jacquie, thank you very
much for your time. I really appreciate it. Thank you very much.
It was a real pleasure. Take care. Once again, I’m Brian for Career Trek, reminding you that this career could be yours. See you next time.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *