Under the Seas

Under the Seas


What do we got here? It’s the guidon. Ready?Always ready! Beautiful morning to go out and do a bay swim. It’s just kicking for a
thousand meters on our back, no arms. Got 22 minutes to do it, if you can’t do it, they’re
sending you packing. It’s the last chance to pass, final bay swim, graded bay swim.
Now I got to pass bay swim, or I go home. A lot of people struggle with the bay swim
at first, but one of the biggest parts is guiding. So at first I think people were kicking
just but they were zig-zagging across the bay so they were doing twice as much work. Because you’re on your back and you’re not
looking where you’re going, so you have to be looking at your feet or something to the
side. It’s like every moment in the bay swim you don’t really think you have to much more
go. So for my final one I was just hurting all over. The final stretch, I honestly don’t
really remember. Down and back, down and back, we’re just going to keep kicking. Just giving
it everything you have, just keep kicking. Just keep kicking, keep kicking. Don’t stop
kicking, keep kicking as hard as you can.It’s only 20 minutes of your life. That’s one of
the big milestones before we can do open water dives and everything so. Having a 100 percent
pass rate on the last bay swim was pretty neat. The whole breath-holding thing’s not
that hard. Alright, so what’s going on right now? Oh, we’re training for pool week. We’re
getting ready to do our pool hits and water proficiency, just making sure we’re ready.
We’re just doing a mock-up. We’ve got fake tanks on, we’re running through and just hitting
each other trying to prepare for what the instructors are going to be throwing at us. What kind of things do they do? We’ll be swimming
along the bottom and they’ll come up, tap us and then knock out our air, rough us up
a little bit, spin us around, disorient us, and get us ready for what the open ocean is
going to throw at us. I’m nervous. It’s exciting, it’s going to be fun. You know, it’s a challenge
that I’ve never done before. I think all of us have the same mentality where we’re just
going to grab it by the horns and roll with it. We’re all a lot stronger than what we
were when we showed up. What do you got going on here today? You’ve got motivated dive coming
up. First dive, man. First open water dive, yeah. Are you pumped for it? I’m definitely
pumped. I’m ready to go. You’re going to do two different types of searches. I hear the
visibility is pretty good down there. I hear it’s zero. I’m kind of nervous. How come?
Because in the pool you can see. Look right, look down, look to the horizon. 1, 2, 3, go!
Right now we have two guys in the water and the purpose of this is so they can find an
object that’s in the water. Right now, that’s our class flag. When you get down there it’s
pretty murky, zero visibility and this is the first day we’re doing this. So it’s pretty much,
it’s chaotic down there. Hooyah 14-30 scuba! This morning we did our PT for our blue and
gold t-shirts. Pretty big day for us. It’s kind of like your formal and informal initiation
into the diving community. We’ve got people from way different backgrounds, all coming
together. At first it’s kind of, you don’t really know what the school is about, am I
going to make it, I have a feeling those questions go through everyone’s mind. Was there ever
a moment when you thought you might not make it? About once a day, at least, maybe twice
a day, everyday. Pain is temporary, pride is forever. Presented to Naval diving and
salvage training center to honor those graduates of U.S. Navy dive schools, past, present and
future will go down in the sea to work. Hooyah Jake! Hooyah t-shirts! Hooyah 14-30 Scuba!

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