Robot Welding with SolidWorks – RoboDK Plug-In

Robot Welding with SolidWorks – RoboDK Plug-In


Hey what’s up guys,
Jeremy here, from RoboDK. Welcome to the second video on our Solidworks
plugin. To follow up with what we saw in the first
tutorial, we will reuse the example with a table and
2 angle irons to show you how you can use RoboDK’s feature
to improve your welding paths. Before going further, I highly recommend you
to take a look that first video. It shows you how to import parts,
curves and points from Solidworks
using our plugin. Ok, let’s get to work. In the first video I showed you how to import,
from SolidWorks, the part
and the welding paths. Let’s do that again really quick. Let’s go on RoboDK tab. “Auto Setup”. Select the welding paths. Don’t forget the faces. They help orient the robot tool. Ok. Back to RoboDK,
We have the same result as before. In the station tree, I can click on “Weld
1 Settings”. That will open the “Curve Follow Project”. I can now click “Update”
and “Simulate”. The welding gun is actually following the
path as it’s supposed to do, but we can see that the orientation is a bit
weird and we can see that the path is far from optimal. Fixing those will be our main goals today. Let’s start by fixing the path itself. In the “Curve Follow Project”, click on
“Select curve”. That shows us the order in which the robot
will do the paths. Going from 1 to 2,
than 3 to 4, than 5 to 6,
followed by 7 to 8 and finally 9 to 10. The order for the welding sections makes sense. But what doesn’t seem to make sense is the
welding direction of some. For example, the 3 to 4 path could be the
other way. To switch it, “right click” the path and
select “switch sense”. You can see that the arrows of that path changed
direction. We can do the same with the 5 to 6 path
and the 7 to 8 path. Once your modifications are done, you can
click “Done” in the left window or you can “right click” on an empty space
of the station and click “Done”. Now if I “Update” and “Simulate”,
I can see that the order of the paths seems to make more sense. Now I can adjust the orientation of the tool
along the path to better suits my needs. Again, in the “Curve Follow Project” I
can click on “Show preferred tool path”. A bunch of ghost tools will appear to show
you the orientation of the tool at different steps of the program. The first tool orientation options you can
try is the “Path to tool offset” around the “Z” axis. To do so, you can either manually enter a
value here or bring your mouse over it and use you scroll
wheel to bring the value up and down. While I’m doing that, you can see the orientation
of the ghost tool changing. In this case, this basic option doesn’t
seem to fix our problem. Fortunately, we have more options to work
with. You can reveal them by clicking on the “blue
plus” here. All of them can be useful for your specific
project. I recommend you to play with them to better
understand their behaviors. But here, for the sake of not having an hour-long
video, I will keep most of these options for a future
tutorial. I will simply change the “rotz” to its
original value, zero, and click on the “+Z” button. As you can see with the ghost tools, the robot
flange will always be on top of the part. Let’s click “Update”
and “Simulate”. That seems very good. As you can see if I use the scroll bar, that
orientation facilitate the cable management of the tool. It has no risk of interfering with the robot. Talking about interfering, approach and retract
movements are very important to avoid collisions between the tool and the part. A “Curve Follow Project” automatically
create an approach and a retract for every welding path. By default, these movements are 100 millimeters
long and are normal to the welding path. We can modify them to be, let’s say, 200
millimeters long and keep the orientation. Just like that. As you can see the approach and retract movements
are simply twice their previous length. We could also chain some movements. I’ll put back the default one to 100 millimeters. And I’ll add, let’s say, a movement along
Z. I’ll set it to 50 millimeters. As you can see, now the robot retracts normal
to the welding path and then straight up. That should help you avoid any collisions. Ok, that’s pretty much everything for today’s
video. I really hope you enjoyed it. If you did subscribe to our channel,
I will be posting a bunch off things related to RoboDK and its new features. Leave a comment below if you think we should
cover a particular topic. Don’t forget to visit our forum if you have
any question about RoboDK and its features. Have a good day guys!

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