Printing Envelopes with Microsoft Mail Merge

Printing Envelopes with Microsoft Mail Merge


Using Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel to
complete an Envelope Mail Merge Hi everybody. Kyle here from Mizzou’s IT Training, and in
this lesson I want to show you how to use Microsoft to perform a mail merge that prints
directly onto envelopes. So, as you can see in this Excel worksheet
I have a list of mailing addresses and over here I have a brand new Microsoft Word document. I’ll click on the Mailings Tab and then click
on the Start Mail Merge button and choose Envelopes… The Envelope Options dialog box opens and
in this dialog box we can choose what size envelope we want to use as well as choose
font settings for the return address and the delivery address on the envelope. The other tab of this dialog box is the printing
options, where you can choose the feed style of the envelope into your printer as well
as the source tray from the printer. We’ll leave these all as default options right
now, and click OK. OK, I’ve zoomed out just a bit so that you
can see the entire envelope, and I have added my return address to the top left corner of
the envelope. Now, I’m going to click on the Home tab and
I”m going to turn on the paragraph marks to show you that there is a text box in the delivery
address section of the envelope just waiting for you to click in it. Click towards the center of the envelope below
half way and you’ll activate the text box that you can type the delivery address in. This method would work for typing in a single
envelope, but since we want to do a mail merge of envelopes I’m going to click on the Mailings
tab, and I’ll click on Select Recipients and Use an Existing List to go find the Microsoft
Excel worksheet that has the mailing addresses on it. Choose the correct worksheet within that workbook,
and click OK. The Insert Merge Field button becomes selectable,
so when we click on it we can add in the merge fields one by one, but there’s also an option
to the left of it called Address Block, so I’ll click on Address Block. I want to quickly switch over to Microsoft
Excel for a moment and show you that one of the keys to having the Address Block work
correctly in Microsoft Word is having your fields labeled in Microsoft Excel as I have
done here. I’ll switch back over to Microsoft Word, and
the Address Block dialog box allows me a couple of options. I can choose how I want the recipient’s name
to show up, and whether or not to include postal address, and how to format that postal
address. I click OK, and the Address Block insertion
is placed in the Delivery Address section of the envelope. I want to see what my envelopes are going
to look like when I print them, so I am going to click on the Home tab, and turn off the
paragraph marks. Then, I’ll click back on the Mailings tab,
and click on the Preview Results button. Once I click on Preview Results I should be
able to use the navigation right next to the Preview Results button to click through the
different addresses to ensure that each one looks the way I want. Now that I’m satisfied with how they look,
I’ll click the Finish and Merge button, and once again, if I choose Print Documents from
this pull down, it will send the finished documents direct to the printer. But, I can choose Edit Individual Documents
and have one last chance to look at these envelopes before I hit the print button. I’ll choose Edit Individual Documents, and
in the dialog box that opens I’ll choose Merge Records>All, and click OK. And now, as you can see, I have a finished
document that is 12 pages because I had 12 addresses in my Excel worksheet, and each
page of this document is a different envelope with a different delivery address. I’ll take my #10 envelopes to the printer,
hit print, and then I’m ready to mail. Thanks for watching! Be sure to subscribe to our Youtube channel,
and go to training.missouri.edu to register for an in-person class.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *