Medical Leg Extension/Leg Curl-Treating ACL Reconstructions & Total Joint Replacements

Medical Leg Extension/Leg Curl-Treating ACL Reconstructions & Total Joint Replacements


If we have a patient
that’s an ACL reconstruction, ACL reconstructions whether
they’re three weeks, four weeks, six weeks out of surgery you can work with them on this machine. The difference is though, as we all know as physical therapists you have to range limit their extension so you don’t stretch the graft. So with this machine, what we can do is whatever weight you choose, or the patient chooses, he’s going to bring, he’s going to push out into the pad to engage the quad. And then bring it up, say to this level. But if I want to range limit him, what I’m going to do is I’m
going to come over here. And I can range limit him to whatever level I need. So therefore we’re
going to protect the graft. So let’s assume that he’s got a right ACL. And now he’s going to work the quad, but he’s not going to stretch the graft. If he had a meniscus surgery, if he had patellar femoral surgery, if he had ACL, this is the
range that you want to work in in the initial phases of rehabilitation. As he moves along into
eight to 12, to 10 weeks, to 16 weeks out of surgery, as we know we can load
that joint even more, and we can open this up. Very simple to open it up. Again you’re going to range limit. And then you can bring it up even more. And then bring it back down slowly. The next patient population you want to really focus on is total joints. So total joints again, you see them four, five, six days out of surgery. Once you do see them, you want to gain the strength back as soon as you can. I see patients, and I
put them on this machine six days out of surgery just to start getting some quad firing. So again, I’m going to range
limit, light weight. And you want to make sure that you’re just getting the quad to fire. So say for example we’re assuming he’s got a right total knee. So we’re going to lighten the weight. We’re going to range limit again
by pulling out this knob. Pulling it down. Locking it in wherever we choose. And then single leg,
we’re going to bring this up. And then back down. So as we’re doing that,
we’re going to engage the quad. For this patient population, light weight. And as he’s coming to therapy, you open him up to where he can gain more strength throughout
the full range for the quad. Now on the flip side, the nice thing about this machine which is very unique, to this machine and no other, is this joint access will
line up with the joint space. For flexion this also will do
that by one switch of a knob. So we’re going to demonstrate that, and show you how we do that. Okay so again, we’re
going to reverse the process. This will be pushed up. This will move over. Okay, easy exit. And then what we do, is
we switch this lever here, and we just pull it
out, and knock it down. And what that does, is that’s going to line up the axis, if we’re
going to work hamstrings. So again same system. Now the difference here
is we need to change the angle for hamstrings
whether your patient population is for meniscus tear, you have an ACL, total joint, even your hip replacement. The way you do that is this knob here, you pull it up. You can bring their legs, say up to here. Now with a total knee, one of the big key
features with a total joint as we all know as therapists, is you have to gain extension. The hamstring is most
efficient at 33 degrees. So if the patient starts here, and they pull down to about here, that’s about 33 degrees. But again, they’re not going to know that. So with this range limiting
device in the back, you can go ahead and
you can, now pull down. And then you can range limit. Now bring it back up. And let me go here. And then do it again. And back up. But I want more extension. So I’m going to bring this up here. And now do it. And back down. So what I’m doing is I’m gaining small range of motion for the hamstring. And again I could change them very easily as we’re goin along. Okay now go. There we go. You have an ACL, that is four weeks out of
surgery, six weeks out of surgery. You need to work their hamstrings because that protects the ACL graft. In this position,
pulling down from A to B, they will work the
hamstring most efficiently, but they won’t put pressure on the graft. And this machine, again
like I said before, it’s going to line up the axis correctly. It’s easy entrance. It’s ease of comfort. And it’s very easy to adjust these levers. And patients can help you as well, because they get used to
where they’re supposed to be, and they know what to do. And it’s very easily to teach them how to do all these things. But I encourage you to look
into this type of device, because if you get this device, you could work a whole bunch
of patient populations. You can have them gain strength, range of motion, endurance, and function.

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