How to Make a Helmet Stand

How to Make a Helmet Stand


Hi! My name is Dave. You’re watching “Make
for Others”. And in this episode we’re going to build
a helmet stand for my friend George’s helmet! I’d been working on a Star Wars Boba Fett
helmet for my friend George and also wanted to give him a few options for where it could
hang in case he wasn’t going to constantly wear it. Some kind of stand or something to hang it
on a wall seemed like the best things to give him. We’ll cover the wall hook project in a different
video, but for the stand I wanted it to be simple and not take away any focus from the
helmet. But when the helmet is off, I want the stand to look really cool. Something George
and his wife would like to have around. So with that in mind, I had recently seen
a technique called slice form where you put together flat pieces to make a three dimensional
shape. There are some amazing slice forms online, but since this is my first one and
it needed to be functional, I went with a sphere form so I could quickly explore the
technique and find what would work best to hold the helmet in place. There are all kinds of ways to do slice forms,
and the basic idea with this one is to have a set of differently sized circles intersect
perpendicularly with a duplicate set of circles so I started working in a program called Adobe
Illustrator to figure out the sizes and intersection points. I printed a small test version of the circles
onto card stock which is basically just thick paper. These were quick to print and cut,
so if I had miscalculated…it wasn’t a big investment in time. We cut out all the circles and then assembled
them. The first test went well, but I wanted to
play around with the sizes of the individual circles and the distances between then. So, we started making more tests at the size
the final piece would be. Eventually, we found the design that worked best. By this time I had found an inexpensive floor
lamp that we would use parts of for the base of the stand and had taken measurements of
the pole to make sure there was enough space in the middle of the slice form for it to
fit. I had some sheets of eight inch acrylic and
really like how smooth a finish it can have with little to no sanding, so I took the final
design and altered it to factor in the thickness of the acrylic so that the pieces would slide
into each other smoothly during assembly. The goal was to get close to a friction fit,
but I figured I would be using some glue to keep it all together. The design file and acrylic got taken to a
friend of mine who has an awesome laser cutter. He also has a lot of experience cutting different
materials and thicknesses, so I didn’t have to do any tests to know how fast the laser
needed to move or what power level to set so it would cut all the way through. The final
pieces only ended up taking about 15 minutes to cut and the toughest part was not watching
the laser work (laughter)! It’s way too bright on the eyeballs. Back at home I used a scotch brite pad to
roughen up the acrylic circles so the spray paint would have something to grab onto…otherwise
it might just flake off over time. It didn’t take too long to sand all of them. Which is
great, because I don’t love sanding. Before the paint, I drilled three holes into
the two circles that would hold the slice form to the stand. They were thin enough that
I could drill them at the same time so the holes would match up exactly. After a quick
test fit with the bolts and nuts, I wiped down all of the circles to get rid of any
dust left over from the sanding and drilling. Two light coats of matte black spray paint
on each side worked out really well. While waiting for them to dry, I removed the
floor lamp electrical wiring and assembled it to decide the height the helmet would sit.
To low and it looks just sad, too high and people might ask why George has a Boba Fett
floor lamp sitting on an end table. A small pipe cutter and a lot of twisting
got the pole to the chosen length. There was a lot of twisting and occasional blade tightening
involved. A lot. If you’re building a stand, but want a really
simple solution to the top part, an alternative is to just take a tennis ball, make some cuts
and use that as what the helmet sits on. Also, while I bought an inexpensive floor
lamp to use, you could just as easily find a table lamp or make something out a block
of wood and a dowel rod or PVC pipe. A few modifications and spray paint and you’d
be good to go. Anyway, once the pole was cut to length, I
used a hammer and nail to put dents where I was going to drill. These dents made it
easier to drill because it gave the drill bit something of a starting point. Otherwise
it would have been really easy for the drill bit to wander around on that curved surface.
A center punch tool would have made this even easier, but I couldn’t find it at the time.
Pretty sure our dog had something to do with it. I tested denting and drilling on the cut part
before using the actual pole. There was a little bit of blow-out on the
test piece, so for the real pole I ended up using a smaller drill bit first and then drilled
through the holes on both sides with the final size drill bit to get rid of the blow-out. I put some boards on both sides of the pole
to stop it from rolling around, marked where the holes needed to go and then repeated the
denting and drilling. As you watch the pole rolling around, you may already be guessing
the problem I’m about to run into. From there I switched out the drill bit to
make the holes the final size and get rid of the blow-out. I was fortunate the holes
on the end of the pole didn’t tear it open. Next time I’d drill a bit further away from
the edge. Now it was finally time to put everything
together, so I screwed the two main circles to the pole; and after that it was going to
just be a matter of assembling the rest of the sphere the same way I did with the paper
tests. However, after I connected a few of the pieces,
it was looking a bit wonky. I could see that the top screw holes didn’t
line up with the others just enough to make problems, so I cut off some of the inner parts
of the larger circles and removed the top bolt and nut. This fixed the problem and next
time, I would lock down the pole more securely for drilling. The great news is, it didn’t
end up needing any glue. It’s a really strong friction fit. And to finish it all off, I just screwed it
onto the base and now we have a finished helmet stand for George! So I’m really happy with how this turned
out. You could easily make something simpler or more complex. It really just depends on
your personal preference. I wanted to try a few different techniques that I hadn’t
done before and I also wanted to make sure that the helmet stayed the main focus. So if you learned something new or you’re
encouraged to make something for someone, awesome! Please let me know in the comments
below and in the mean time don’t forget to subscribe and thanks for watching!

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